Loss of Privacy

Keeping you informed on recent losses to privacy and civil rights worldwide.

Browsing Posts tagged tracking

RFID/NFC (radio-frequency identification/near-field communication) readers can now be used to steal your personal information, including credit-card data, right from your pocket. More than 10 million identities are digitally pick pocketed every year, and these devices are among the most common tools criminals use.

That’s why we partnered with with global information-protection authority Norton to create the world’s first RFID-blocking jeans to develop the world’s first RFID-block jeans and blazer. The READY Active Jeans and Work-It Blazer protected by Norton have two pockets lined with special RFID-blocking fabric, which shields your credit cards from scanning devices.

Source.

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Al Jazeera America has created a graphic novel explaining big data. In the graphic novel, reads learn about what we gain and what we give up.

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The MPs on the Science and Technology select committee called for the Government to draw up new guidelines for websites and apps explaining clearly how they use personal data, warning that laws will be needed if companies fail to comply.

The committee highlighted terms for Facebook Messenger’s mobile app, used by more than 200,000 million people a month, that means it can gain direct access to a mobile or tablet, including to take pictures or make videos, at any time without explicit confirmation from the owner.

The MP said that they should simplify the conditions of using their services, which are designed for US courts, because they are so impenetrable that “no reasonable person” can be expected to understand them.

Android users can try tinfoil as a workaround. It’s available at Google play.

More at The Telegraph.

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This post originally appeared on medium.com, but it has been deleted because it violates their terms of service. I thought it was an informative post, but I don’t run medium.com nor have I read their terms of service.

Therefore, I went to the wayback machine, grabbed a copy and converted it into a pdf to preserve the post here as well.

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From EPIC:

The FBI announced that the Next Generation Identification system, one of the largest biometric databases in the world, has reached “full operational capability.” In 2013, EPIC filed a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit about the NGI program. EPIC obtained documents that revealed an acceptance of a 20% error rate in facial recognition searches. Earlier this year, EPIC joined a coalition of civil liberties groups to urge the Attorney General Eric Holder to release an updated Privacy Impact Assessment for the NGI. The NGI is tied to “Rap Back,” the FBI’s ongoing investigation of civilians in trusted positions. EPIC also obtained FOIA documents revealing FBI agreements with state DMVs to run facial recognition searches, linked to NGI, on DMV databases. EPIC’s recent Spotlight on Surveillance concluded that NGI has “far-reaching implications for personal privacy and the risks of mass surveillance.” For more information, see EPIC: EPIC v. FBI – Next Generation identification.

Discussion at Slashdot.

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