Loss of Privacy

Keeping you informed on recent losses to privacy and civil rights worldwide.

Browsing Posts tagged think of the children

Robert Demond picked up his eight year old son from school and attempted to discuss a matter with his son. The son didn’t respond correctly and Demond made the boy walk home to think about his actions.

When De Mond arrived with his 3-year-old son at Kilauea Elementary School to pick up his two older boys, ages 6 and 8, from an A-Plus Program one day in late August or early September, he noticed his eldest had been placed in time-out.

“I asked him, ‘Why were you in time-out at A-Plus?’” De Mond said. “He told me, ‘I don’t know.’ I asked him again and he said, ‘I don’t know.’”

He told his son: “I don’t know is not an answer. You need to take responsibility for your actions. There has to be a reason that you were placed in time-out.”

A mile from their house, he dropped his son off and asked him to “please walk home. When you walk home, you will have an answer better than ‘I don’t know.’ And when you do come home you’ll have an answer,” he said.

De Mond said the stretch of the two-lane roadway — Kuhio Highway — is in a safe, rural area with acre-size agricultural lots, and a wide shoulder, 10 to 25 feet wide, where it’s not uncommon to see people walking or riding their bikes.

This is the road he walked on.


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A judge called his actions “old school” and not appropriate.

Demond was sentenced to a one-year probation, a $200 fine and to a child parenting class for a misdemeanor charge of second-degree endangering the welfare of a minor.

Demond told the judge that it was a common form of punishment when he was a kid and that he didn’t see it as morally wrong or criminal.

“How far did you make him walk?” asked Judge Kathleen Watanabe.

“About a mile,” Demond said.

These are different times, Watanabe said. It is understandable that you became upset with your son, but it is dangerous for children to walk along the highway, and there are predators out there, she said. The age of the child was not revealed in the course of the hearing and the Office of the Prosecuting Attorney would not divulge further information.

These are different times. We have Amber Alerts via cell phone messages, communications technology that allows law enforcement to act quickly and safe traffic laws with more responsive vehicles.

It’s safer for children to walk home today than it was 30 or even 50 years ago. Parents, however, have to worry about being thrown in jail for not keeping your child on a leash and hovering over them 24/7.

The problem is that when that one child does go missing or has something bad happen to them, they get wall-to-wall coverage, making the situation appear worse than it really is.

The only lesson learned here is the child knows his father cannot properly discipline him for his actions. Will the court be as lenient when he grow up and appears in juvenile court for his behavior?

The state recommended a child parenting course and supports the defendant’s motion for a deferred acceptance of his no contest plea. It allows him to motion the court to expunge the charge from his record after completing his probation.

Watanabe granted the motion.

Demond does not need parenting classes. He was already doing it right. Maybe when he’s finished taking parenting classes he can teach his son how life isn’t fair, even when you do the right thing.

For the record, in New York State, schools are not legally required to provide busing for children who live less than two miles from the school up to eighth grade and three miles for those in high school. There are thousands of children every day who walk to school every day, crossing highways and busy roads. They aren’t snatched up by pedophiles or hit by cars because their parents and the schools teach them how to be responsible when walking home.

According to Hawaii law, or specifically the regulations that allow children to be bused to school, any child K-5 can only ride the bus if they live more than 1 mile from the school and for kids in 6th grade and higher the distance has to be 1.5 miles.

So it’s perfectly fine to walk a mile if you are going to/from school, but it’s not okay if you are being disciplined for something.

This ruling is as ignorant as the mother who was arrested for letting her children play outside.

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With Banned Books Week approaching, Reddit user AndiArch has created a fantastic list of banned/challenged books that everyone can enjoy. I reproduce the list below, so that parents can have a look at the books and start a discussion with their children.

Toddler/Nursery School

  • In the Night Kitchen, by Maurice Sendak; Reasons: nudity
  • The Family Book, by Todd Parr; (Reasons: homosexuality, racially-mixed families)
  • My Mom’s Having A Baby! A Kid’s Month-by-Month Guide to Pregnancy, by Dori Hillestad Butler; Reasons: nudity; sex education; sexually explicit; unsuited to age group
  • Everyone Poops, by Taro Gomi; (Reasons: obscenity, misleading illustrations)

Pre-K

  • King & King, by Linda de Haan; Reason: homosexuality
  • My Princess Boy, by Cheryl Kilodavis; (Reason: homosexuality, gender line blurring)
  • Draw Me A Star, by Eric Carle; Reason: nudity
  • Bumbe-Ardy, by Maurice Sendak; (Reason: death, too sad for children)
  • Where the Wild Things Are, by Maurice Sendak; Reason: witchcraft, supernatural elements

K

  • And Tango Makes Three, Peter Parnell and Justin Richardson; Reason: homosexuality, religious viewpoint, and unsuited to age group
  • The Pain and the Great One, Judy Blume; (Reason: animosity between siblings)
  • A Light in the Attic, Shel Silverstein; Reason: unsuited to age group, inappropriate subject matter
  • The Rabbits’ Wedding, Garth Williams; Reason: interracial marriage
  • The Story About Ping, Marjorie Flack; (Reason: spanking)
  • Sylvester and the Magic Pebble, William Steig; Reason: police officers depicted as pigs

Early Elementary

  • The Magic Tree House, series, Mary Pope Osborne; (Reason: encourages dishonesty)
  • Harry Potter, J.K. Rowling; Reasons: anti-family, occult/Satanism, religious viewpoint, violence
  • Bridge to Terabithia, Katherine Paterson; Reasons: occult/Satanism, offensive language, violence
  • Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing, Judy Blume; (Reasons: child lacks discipline, bad parenting)
  • Freckle Juice, Judy Blume; (Reasons: bad parenting)
  • The Boxcar Children, series, Gertrude Chandler Warner; (Reason: anti-family, depictions of criminal activities)
  • The Witches, Roald Dahl; Reason: unsuited to age group, occult
  • Blubber, Judy Blume; Reason: Bullying
  • James and the Giant Peach, Roald Dahl; Reason: violence, occult, anti-family, language
  • The Giving Tree, Shel Silverstein; Reason: unsuited to age group

Late Elementary

  • The Boy Who Lost His Face, Louis Sachar; (Reason: bullying, occult)
  • The Great Gilly Hopkins, Katherine Patterson; Reason: anti-family, unsuited to age group
  • The Giver, Lois Lowry; Reasons: violence, unsuited to age group
  • Flashcards of My Life, Charise Mericle Harper; Reasons: sexually explicit and unsuited to age group
  • The Golden Compass, His Dark Materials series, Philip Pullman; Reason: religious viewpoint
  • The Upstairs Room, by Johanna Reiss; Reason: inappropriate language, depictions of war
  • Olive’s Ocean, by Kevin Henkes; Reasons: offensive language, sexually explicit
  • Blood and Chocolate, by Annette Curtis Klause; Reasons: sexually explicit, unsuited to age group (Note: I read this in elementary school, but it is likely better suited to late middle school at the earliest)
  • Captain Underpants, series, by Dav Pilkey; Reasons: offensive language, unsuited to age group
  • Number the Stars, Lois Lowry; (Reasons: setting, inappropriate to age group)
  • Julie of the Wolves, by Jean Craighead George; Reasons: unsuited to age group, violence
  • Island of the Blue Dolphins, by Scott O’Dell; (Reasons: anti-family, violence)
  • Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret, by Judy Blume; (Reasons: puberty)
  • Crazy Lady!, by Jane Leslie Conly; Reason: offensive language
  • Scary Stories (series), by Alvin Schwartz; Reasons: insensitivity, occult/Satanism, unsuited to age group
  • Athletic Shorts, by Chris Crutcher; Reasons: homosexuality and offensive language
  • Goosebumps (series), by R.L. Stine; Reasons: violence, occult, satanic themes

Middle School

  • Fat Kid Rules the World, by K.L. Going; Reason: depression, suicidal thoughts
  • Earth’s Children (series), by Jean M. Auel; Reason: violence, anti-family, (scientific inaccuracies)
  • Whale Talk, by Chris Crutcher; Reasons: racism, offensive language
  • The Lord of the Rings, by J.R.R. Tolkien; (Reasons: satanic themes)
  • The Chocolate War, by Robert Cormier; Reasons: offensive language, sexually explicit, unsuited to age
  • Go Ask Alice, by Anonymous; Reasons: drugs, offensive language, sexually explicit
  • Fallen Angels, by Walter Dean Myers; Reason: offensive language
  • Taming the Star Runner, by S.E. Hinton; Reason: offensive language
  • 13: Thirteen Stories That Capture the Agony and Ecstasy of Being Thirteen, by James Howe, ed.; (Reason: unsuited to age group)
  • ttyl, Internet Girls series, by Lauren Myracle; Reasons: offensive language, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  • The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins (late middle school); Reasons: sexually explicit, unsuited to age group, and violence
  • My Brother Sam is Dead, by James Lincoln Collier and Christopher Collier; (Reason: violence, depictions of war)
  • Thirteen Reasons Why, by Jay Asher; Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, sexually explicit, suicide, unsuited for age group
  • Detour for Emmy, by Marilyn Reynolds; Reason: sexual content
  • A Day No Pigs Would Die, by Robert Newton Peck; Reason: violence, girl, (explicit descriptions of animal mating behaviors)
  • The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain; Reason: offensive language
  • The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie; Reasons: offensive language, racism, sex education, unsuited to age group, and violence

Early High School

  • To Kill A Mockingbird, by Harper Lee; Reasons: offensive language, racism, unsuited to age group
  • Bless Me, Ultima, by Rudolfo Anaya; Reasons: occult/satanism, offensive language, sexually explicit, and violence
  • The Color Purple, by Alice Walker; Reasons: homosexuality, offensive language, sexually explicit
  • Forever, by Judy Blume; Reasons: offensive language, sexual content
  • The Fault in Our Stars, by John Green; (Reason: depression, too “deep” for age group)
  • The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky; Reasons: homosexuality, offensive language, sexually explicit
  • Summer of My German Soldier, by Bette Greene; Reasons: offensive language, racism, sexually explicit
  • Crank, by Ellen Hopkins; Reasons: drugs, offensive language, and sexually explicit
  • I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, by Maya Angelou; Reasons: offensive language, sexually explicit
  • Tweak: Growing Up on Methamphetamines, by Nic Sheff; (Reasons: drug use, unsuited to age group)
  • We All Fall Down, by Robert Cormier; Reason: offensive language, sexual content
  • Lush, series, by Natasha Friend; Reasons: drugs, offensive language, sexually explicit, and unsuited to age group
  • The Color of Earth (series), by Kim Dong Hwa; Reasons: nudity; sex education; sexually explicit; unsuited to age group
  • Looking for Alaska, by John Green; Reasons: Offensive language, sexually explicit, unsuited for age group
  • My Sister’s Keeper, by Jodi Picoult; Reasons: homosexuality, offensive language, religious viewpoint, sexism, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group, violence

Late High School

  • The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini; Reasons: offensive language, sexually explicit, and unsuited to age group
  • What My Mother Doesn’t Know, by Sonya Sones; Reasons: sexism, sexually explicit, and unsuited to age group
  • Nickel and Dimed, by Barbara Ehrenreich; Reasons: drugs, inaccurate, offensive language, political viewpoint, and religious viewpoint
  • Revolutionary Voices, edited by Amy Sonnie; Reasons: homosexuality and sexually explicit
  • The Catcher in the Rye, by J. D. Salinger; Reasons: sexual content, offensive language, unsuited to age group
  • Beloved, by Toni Morrison; Reasons: offensive language, sexually explicit, and unsuited to age group
  • The Glass Castle, by Jeanette Walls; Reasons: Offensive language, sexually explicit

While AndiArch’s list is not complete in any way and was made for his/her own personal reasons, there are some great books on this list. While I have never read The Box Car Children, it spurred on another post about the series and, since I can get a free copy of the original at Project Gutenberg, I’m probably going to check some out and see what all the fuss is about.

Banned Books Week is sponsored by the American Library Association.

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Alex Evans doesn’t understand why his school suspended him for playing an imaginary game during recess.

“I was trying to save people and I just can’t believe I got dispended,” says Alex Evans, who doesn’t understand his suspension any better than he can pronounce it.

“It’s called ‘rescue the world,’” he says.

But his imaginary play broke the school’s real rules. The school lists “absolutes” designed to keep a safe environment. The list includes absolutely no fighting, real or imaginary; no weapons, real or imaginary.

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In light of Obama’s proposal this week to study the impact of media on violence, Adam examines what exactly it is about video game violence that attracts us, and how those unfamiliar with new media have a tendency to misconstrue it.

Source.

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In the wake of the Sandy Hook shooting, Albuquerque public schools has decided to embrace all out surveillance on its students. Instead of looking at the reasons behind why people decide to shoot up schools, New Mexico is throwing money at more surveillance cameras to solve the problem of school violence.

APS uses surveillance cams to monitor schools

The digital cameras are motion activated, grabbing onto people as they move. They’re in hallways, libraries, cafeterias, playgrounds and parking lots.

“Someone watching the camera can see if a person comes on campus who doesn’t belong there, and they can immediately call help if they need to or go to the door and see who the person is,” explained Lt. Rider. “They can address them before they even enter the campus.”

So far they’ve helped solve vandalism and even keep an eye on teachers, but they’re also tracking students.

APS also uses the cameras for other things. Monday they used them to monitor weather conditions especially at their East Mountain campuses.

The public school systems in the United States are becoming more and more indoctrination centers where everyone is monitored and tracked. Once young students are trained to be monitored 24/7, such systems will be moved to the general public where monitoring and tracking will no longer seem out of the ordinary and privacy is a thing of the past.

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