Loss of Privacy

Keeping you informed on recent losses to privacy and civil rights worldwide.

Browsing Posts tagged Security

From EPIC:

Beginning in 2015, many federal facilities will require a “Real ID” for entry where identification is required. Several states have opted out of the Real ID Act, a federal mandate to modify the design of state drivers licenses, raising questions about the ability of people in those states to access federal buildings and board commercial aircraft. EPIC, supported by a broad coalition, opposed the Real ID regulations, arguing that many of the required identification techniques, such as facial recognition and RFID tags, compromise privacy and enable surveillance. EPIC, joined by technical experts and legal scholars, also provided detailed comments to the Department of Homeland Security about the program and later issued a L6[report: “REAL ID Implementation Review: Few Benefits, Staggering Costs” (May 2008). For more information see: EPIC: National ID and the Real ID Act.

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From Help Net Security:

After having disclosed the extent of the employees’ information stolen in the recent hack to the California Attorney General’s Office, Sony Pictures Entertainment (SPE) has sent out an email to the affected workers, outlining the scope of the potential damage the “brazen cyber attack” might bring to them personally.

“Although SPE is in the process of investigating the scope of the cyber attack, SPE believes that the following types of personally identifiable information that you provided to SPE may have been obtained by unauthorized individuals: (i) name, (ii) address, (iii) Social Security Number, driver’s license number, passport number, and/or other government identifier, (iv) bank account information, (v) credit card information for corporate travel and expense, (vi) username and passwords, (vii) compensation and (viii) other employment related information,” the letter described.

Download (PDF, 149KB)

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Verizon’s new encryption standard comes with law enforcement access to secure phone conversations.

Verizon Voice Cypher, the product introduced on Thursday with the encryption company Cellcrypt, offers business and government customers end-to-end encryption for voice calls on iOS, Android, or BlackBerry devices equipped with a special app. The encryption software provides secure communications for people speaking on devices with the app, regardless of their wireless carrier, and it can also connect to an organization’s secure phone system.

Cellcrypt and Verizon both say that law enforcement agencies will be able to access communications that take place over Voice Cypher, so long as they’re able to prove that there’s a legitimate law enforcement reason for doing so. Seth Polansky, Cellcrypt’s vice president for North America, disputes the idea that building technology to allow wiretapping is a security risk. “It’s only creating a weakness for government agencies,” he says. “Just because a government access option exists, it doesn’t mean other companies can access it.”

If you have created a weakness for government agencies, you have created a weakness for everyone to exploit.

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The MPs on the Science and Technology select committee called for the Government to draw up new guidelines for websites and apps explaining clearly how they use personal data, warning that laws will be needed if companies fail to comply.

The committee highlighted terms for Facebook Messenger’s mobile app, used by more than 200,000 million people a month, that means it can gain direct access to a mobile or tablet, including to take pictures or make videos, at any time without explicit confirmation from the owner.

The MP said that they should simplify the conditions of using their services, which are designed for US courts, because they are so impenetrable that “no reasonable person” can be expected to understand them.

Android users can try tinfoil as a workaround. It’s available at Google play.

More at The Telegraph.

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While there is no uniform standard in America for tabulating the incidence of crime against ATM users, the U.S. Department of Justice has estimated that such attacks occur at a proportion as low as 1 in 3.5 million transactions.

At this rate, the average American is in greater danger of being hit by a bus while crossing the street to get to an ATM than of being accosted while using it.

ATM transaction data, on the other hand, has proven far more difficult to protect — as we’ve seen in recent ATM skimming events that have netted millions of dollars within minutes for determined thieves.

To help consumers to help themselves, Diebold has created an infographic that ATM deployers can use to teach customers about ATM fraud. The information can be distributed as a flyer, mailer or email, posted online or at a machine — even displayed on the ATM screen itself.

ATM Skimming - Modern-Day Bank Robbery [infographic]
ATM Skimming – Modern-Day Bank Robbery [infographic]
Compliments of ATMmarketplace.com

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