Loss of Privacy

Keeping you informed on recent losses to privacy and civil rights worldwide.

Browsing Posts tagged Privacy

It started with a hidden camera we discovered was at the Mobile On The Run on Clarkson, just south of the Chesterfield Mall. Video from a hidden camera showed people going to the bathroom and the videos were posted on a pornographic web site.

Our investigation started on the East Coast, where a man said he clicked on a banner that took him to the offensive porn web site. He noticed many victims wearing company shirts. That’s how we found victim Rob Cheney who told us, “When I saw myself pooping, I was just like you’ve gotta be kidding me.”

We asked Cheney for a list of places where he used the bathroom. He explained, “I had to think because you don’t document everywhere you go to the bathroom, so it took me awhile to pinpoint where it was.”

Fox 2 checked his list of rest rooms, comparing the online video to each bathroom. Then we found a perfect match, from the floor tiles to the drain by the toilet. Cheney just moved to the area and laughed, “Three weeks and I’m already on a poop cam pretty much. So three weeks and everybody’s seen me poop? That’s terrible. Hahaha.”

The police officer is set to face a grand jury.

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It seems the TSA are now in the business submitting Privacy Complaints to take down videos. This video goes over the email that I received and what I have done to deal with it right so far.

Video under threat
LiveLeak back up

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The NSA has nothing on the ed tech startup known as Knewton.

The data analytics firm has peered into the brains of more than 4 million students across the country. By monitoring every mouse click, every keystroke, every split-second hesitation as children work through digital textbooks, Knewton is able to find out not just what individual kids know, but how they think. It can tell who has trouble focusing on science before lunch — and who will struggle with fractions next Thursday.

Even as Congress moves to rein in the National Security Agency, private-sector data mining has galloped forward — perhaps nowhere faster than in education. Both Republicans and Democrats have embraced the practice. And the Obama administration has encouraged it, even relaxing federal privacy law to allow school districts to share student data more widely.

At least in Nevada, it will cost a parent $10,000 to learn what data the schools are collecting on his child.

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