Loss of Privacy

Keeping you informed on recent losses to privacy and civil rights worldwide.

Browsing Posts tagged police

“[A big event] doesn’t trigger privacy concerns,” she says. “What does trigger privacy concerns is the City of Boston installing a network of cameras — some in residential neighborhoods — that enable law enforcement to track individual people from the moment that we leave our homes in the morning until the moment we return at night, seeing basically everywhere we went and everything that we did.”

Boston Police won’t say how many cameras are already in the city’s network, or how many new ones are going up for the marathon. But some of them will stay online afterward.

More at NPR.

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John Iadarola host of The Young Turks and guest Michael Shure discuss another assault by a cop on a suspect, but who was at fault?

“It’s that time again; when we tell you about how our police force is constantly terrible at not killing or assaulting a suspect and following the law, but this time instead of a gun, taser, excessive force, or a K-9 unit, the police in question apparently just said, ‘screw it, car it is’, and maybe with an interesting plot twist. An officer in Marana, Arizona was following Mario Valencia in his patrol car while Valencia was on a crime spree on foot. Rather than being bothered with due process and all that paperwork the officer in question decided to ram Valencia with his patrol car sending Valencia spinning into the air like an exasperated toddler would to a slinky.

Marana Police Chief Terry Rozema officially stated that the officer did the right thing as Valencia was headed to a populated area. Valencia survived his run in with police and faces fifteen separate charges.”

Did this police officer make the right call?

More at CNN.

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A mentally ill woman, Natasha McKenna, has died in police custody in Fairfax, Virginia after receiving four taser blasts to her back. McKenna was in police custody for two days before she was shackled and left unattended. She was finally ready to be moved when her deteriorating mental state caused her to begin resisting police and screaming, whereas the police responded by six Sheriff’s deputies putting on full biohazard suits and attempting to place her in a restrained wheel chair. When she wouldn’t bend her knees to sit in the chair McKenna was tasered, allowing her to be restrained in the chair. Within minutes of being shocked McKenna stopped breathing and CPR efforts were fruitless in attempting to revive her. She was revived three times in an ambulance before finally being pronounced deceased. Officials are awaiting the results of an autopsy to determine the actual cause of her death.

The manufacture of the TASER device warns against using the stungun on persons with ‘excited delirium’.

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After several community meetings, a San Jose city commission has decided to endorse use of a police drone. The pilot project still needs approval from the city council, but this marks an important step for police in getting the public to buy in.

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People were stopped and not arrested more than 250,000 times by Chicago police officers from May 2014 to August 2014 — a rate much higher than New York City’s police department at the height of its use of stop-and-frisk in 2011, according to a new report by the ACLU of Illinois.

The report,released Monday, said Chicago overuses the highly criticized practice — which, much like New York’s, disproportionately targets black people and other minorities.
The review found that black people were stopped at a much higher rate. According to the report, African-Americans were subject to 72% of all stops yet account for just 32% of Chicago’s population.

Source.

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