Loss of Privacy

Keeping you informed on recent losses to privacy and civil rights worldwide.

Browsing Posts tagged police

Each of the records, which are gathered by license plate cameras mounted on police cars or at fixed locations, includes a photograph and the time and place that a particular vehicle was imaged. Strung together, the records can paint a picture of where a person has traveled — whether to the scene of a crime, a doctor’s office or to church.

The system can instantly alert patrol officers of a “hit” on a stolen car or, more often, a vehicle whose registration has lapsed and is ripe for ticketing. Stored records also can be accessed later as part of criminal investigations.

Records used for those purposes, though, constitute only a small fraction of all the data being saved. The vast majority of the vehicles tracked in the license-plate data were driven not by scofflaws or criminals but by innocent citizens who happen to be photographed driving to work or while running errands.

And least nine of New York’s most populous counties — Monroe, Erie, Onondaga, Albany, Broome, Westchester, Suffolk and Nassau — are now engaged in long-term storage of these records.

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ABC News | ABC Sports News

Story from NY Times.

The officer loses his badge and gun and placed on modified assignment.

The original video.

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This is the story of Jesse Snodgrass, a kid with Aspergers Syndrome who was entrapped by an undercover cop posing as a student at Jesse’s high school. This is the story of how the war on drugs preys on the most vulnerable.

Snodgrass’s legal defense fund.

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Jonathan Meister was retrieving some stuff he was storing at an ex-roommate’s home when he looked up to find several members of the Hawthorne Police Department approaching.

The South Bay man claims officers didn’t give him a chance to explain what he was doing before placing him in handcuffs, beating him and using a stun gun to shock him into submission.

The problem began when police reportedly misunderstood Meister’s attempts to speak in sign language as threatening gestures.

Moreover, officers didn’t realize that when they handcuffed Meister, who is “profoundly deaf” and non-verbal, they took away his ability to communicate.

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An officer was placed on leave after he was arrested, accused of spitting on a woman and calling her a racial slur.

Clayton County police Officer Thomas Sheats faces simple battery, simple assault and disorderly conduct.

He was arrested and booked into the Henry County Jail but has since bonded out.

Henry County police said the incident began June 29 on Highway 155 in Locust Grove. Michele Griffith, 27, said that’s whereSheats followed her for miles, blowing his horn, driving erratically and bumping her car.

Griffith said when they pulled into a parking lot where she was going to get pizza, Sheats approached her car and angrily shouted at her.

“Why the (expletive) you going 35 miles per hour on a 45 mile per hour road,” Griffith saidSheats told her.

she told Sheats he could have went around her. She said that’s when he really exploded.

“‘I couldn’t pass, you low life piece of (expletive) (n-word)’ … and (he) spit on me,” Griffith said was Sheats’ response.

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