Loss of Privacy

Keeping you informed on recent losses to privacy and civil rights worldwide.

Browsing Posts tagged government

Nearly a decade after the George W. Bush administration’s warrantless spying program came to light, the issue of mass government surveillance has again sparked a global outcry with the disclosures of whistleblower Edward Snowden. Leaks of National Security Agency files have exposed a mammoth spying apparatus that stretches across the planet, from phone records to text messages to social media and email, from the internal communications of climate summits to those of foreign missions and even individual heads of state. Today privacy advocates are holding one of their biggest online actions so far with “The Day We Fight Back Against Mass Surveillance.”

Thousands of websites will speak in one voice, displaying a banner encouraging visitors to fight back by posting memes and changing their social media avatars to reflect their demands, as well as contacting their members of Congress to push through surveillance reform legislation. The action is inspired in part by the late Internet open-access activist Aaron Swartz, who helped set a precedent in January 2012 when more than 8,000 websites went dark for 12 hours in protest of a pair of controversial bills that were being debated in Congress: the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and the PROTECT IP Act (PIPA). The bills died in committee in the wake of protests. We discuss today’s global action with Rainey Reitman, activism director at the Electronic Frontier Foundation and co-founder of the Freedom of the Press Foundation.

Transcript.

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Former NSA contractor and whistleblower Edward Snowden was interviewed for the German television network ARD. It was big news in Germany, but it appears as if it was blocked intentionally in the United States.

It has been removed several time from YouTube.

From Live Leak:

From Vimeo:

Edward Snowden Exclusive Interview for German TV (NDR) from Edward Snow on Vimeo.

Whistleblower Edward Snowden leaked the documents about US mass surveillance. He spoke about his disclosures and his life to NDR investigative journalist Hubert Seipel in Moscow.

This video was posted on ARD's youtube channel, but it's not available for the rest of the world.. This video belongs to the NDR. I do not claim any rights to this video.

It might be wise to download it at the Vimeo link while you can.

You can read the transcript here.

Also of note is the Guardian’s How Edward Snowden went from loyal NSA contractor to whistleblower.

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Abby Martin speaks with whistleblowers Coleen Rowley and Jesselyn Radack their visit with NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden in Russia, where they awarded him the Sam Adams Associates Award for Integrity and Intelligence.

Source.

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Appearances:
Maggie Gyllenhaal
Roger Waters
Oliver Stone
Daniel Ellsberg
Phil Donahue
Michael Ratner
Alice Walker
Tom Morello
Matt Taibbi
Peter Sarsgaard
Angela Davis
Moby
Molly Crabapple
Tim DeChristopher
LT Dan Choi
Bishop George Packard
Russell Brand
Allan Nairn
Chris Hedges
Wallace Shawn
Adhaf Soueif
Josh Stieber
Michael Ratner

This work produced by independent volunteers in collaboration with the Bradley Manning Support Network.

I am Bradley Manning.

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A new Pew Research poll has just come out and, sadly, it reveals that a majority of Americans find the NSA phone tacking system, known as PRISM, is okay with them as long as it’s for fighting terrorism. What many privacy advocates fear is true. Americans are too happy to give up their privacy in exchange for some perceived safety from terrorism.

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Currently 62% say it is more important for the federal government to investigate possible terrorist threats, even if that intrudes on personal privacy. Just 34% say it is more important for the government not to intrude on personal privacy, even if that limits its ability to investigate possible terrorist threats.

 

 

 

 

 

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For these 62%, the revelations of last week mean nothing. They don’t care if their every movement in life is tracked, recorded, and stored. They bought the lies from the government and are willing to stick with it.

One interesting, and possible huge clue is how the support varies.

Overall, those who disagree with the government’s data monitoring are following the reports somewhat more closely than those who support them. Among those who find the government’s tracking of phone records to be unacceptable, 31% are following the story very closely, compared with 21% among those who say it is acceptable. Similarly with respect to reports about government monitoring of email and online activities, 28% of those who say this should not be done are following the news very closely, compared with 23% of those who approve of the practice.

It is interesting that those who are following the reports, reading and learning what they entail, are more likely to not support what the government has been doing. Then again, 62% of Americans can’t even pass the official US Citizen test given to foreigners who wish to become citizens. Should we be so surprised that they are happy to give up their freedoms for a little bit of perceived safety?

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