Loss of Privacy

Keeping you informed on recent losses to privacy and civil rights worldwide.

Browsing Posts tagged DHS

NPR.

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The Department of Homeland Security has said it is looking for a device that could replace pat downs and still detect metal and explosives.

In a government document, the Department of Homeland Security said it seeks a hand-held device that weighs less than 5 pounds and can determine whether a hidden object on a passenger is a weapon or explosive. The device should produce a result in less than 15 seconds, the TSA request said.

Plan approval and testing could take at least a year. The request did not say how soon the device might show up at airports.

While airport security has become a lesson in massive overkill, a device such as this could actually ease the tension at the airports between the TSA and passengers. Pat downs are far too invasive and, if such a device is created, it would go a long way in mending relations between the general public and the uneducated TSA employees.

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The Senate Appropriations Committee voted 30-0 to increase airline passenger security fees in an effort to cover shortfalls at the TSA.

The 2013 Homeland Security appropriations bill would increase one-way fees for passengers from $2.50 to $5 in order to close a budget shortfall at the Transportation Security Administration.

Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-La.) said the $315 million in funding would otherwise come from taxpayers and argued it is better to stick passengers who rely on TSA with the bill.

Apparently, the committee didn’t seek to find other ways to cut the TSA budget. Some things they could have done are:

1) Eliminate all aspects of security theater
2) Eliminate warehouses full of unused equipment and stop buying more
3) Privatization of security at the airports

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From the very first installation of full body scanners at the nation’s airports there have been questions about their legality as well as their effectiveness. An unclassified report, which can be found on the US government’s website, now concedes that the scanners probably don’t work.

Read the rest of my article at The Daily Censored.

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When it comes to copyright infringement, the RIAA and Homeland Security’s ICE department have been working side by side to take down the pirates. The RIAA tells the feds who they think are in the wrong; the feds investigate, and then determine if they have the right to seize the domain for that site. But that’s not exactly the case. We’ll give you an example of where they seized first, and then investigated.

In other words, having goaded the government into an outrageous and very public seizure of the blog, the RIAA members refused to follow up and answer the government’s questions. In turn, the government acted shamefully, not returning the blog or apologizing for its apparent mistake, but instead secretly asking the court to extend the seizure and deny Dajaz1 the right to seek return of its property or otherwise get due process. The government also refused to answer Congressional questions about the case. ICE finally released the domain name in December of 2011, again with no explanation.

The government failed to do its job. It did not represent the citizens of the United States. It did, however, cow-tow to the RIAA.

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