Loss of Privacy

Keeping you informed on recent losses to privacy and civil rights worldwide.

Browsing Posts tagged Civil Rights

Jonathan Meister was retrieving some stuff he was storing at an ex-roommate’s home when he looked up to find several members of the Hawthorne Police Department approaching.

The South Bay man claims officers didn’t give him a chance to explain what he was doing before placing him in handcuffs, beating him and using a stun gun to shock him into submission.

The problem began when police reportedly misunderstood Meister’s attempts to speak in sign language as threatening gestures.

Moreover, officers didn’t realize that when they handcuffed Meister, who is “profoundly deaf” and non-verbal, they took away his ability to communicate.

Source.

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An officer was placed on leave after he was arrested, accused of spitting on a woman and calling her a racial slur.

Clayton County police Officer Thomas Sheats faces simple battery, simple assault and disorderly conduct.

He was arrested and booked into the Henry County Jail but has since bonded out.

Henry County police said the incident began June 29 on Highway 155 in Locust Grove. Michele Griffith, 27, said that’s whereSheats followed her for miles, blowing his horn, driving erratically and bumping her car.

Griffith said when they pulled into a parking lot where she was going to get pizza, Sheats approached her car and angrily shouted at her.

“Why the (expletive) you going 35 miles per hour on a 45 mile per hour road,” Griffith saidSheats told her.

she told Sheats he could have went around her. She said that’s when he really exploded.

“‘I couldn’t pass, you low life piece of (expletive) (n-word)’ … and (he) spit on me,” Griffith said was Sheats’ response.

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Yes, having your foot run over by a heavy wheelchair hurts. Most people would respond with an audible sound, usually a profanity. This officer, however, immediately responds by shoving the man in his head so hard that his wheelchair tipped over and he fell out of it.

The police told him to move along. The officer saw the wheelchair coming and deliberately left himself in the way, provoking the incident. A normal person would have stepped back or moved their feet out of the way.

Davidson tells Kincade, “You did not drive over me…. Now you’re going to jail.” Kincade replies that he did not see the lieutenant’s foot. He was then arrested for battery on a law enforcement officer, according to the station. That case was later dismissed.

Flannelly said he and six other members of the command staff unanimously felt Davidson used conduct unbecoming of an officer and an excessive use of force. An internal review of the incident by authorities determined that he should be fired, according to WLFI. On appeal, the five civilians on Lafayette’s Civil Service Commission ruled Davidson had not demonstrated excessive use of force and lessened the punishment, demoting Davidson in rank to officer and giving him 30 days of suspension without pay.

And that is police justice. What would have happened if a person shoved an officer like this? Do you think a demotion in rank at work and a short suspension would be the only consequence?

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Dr. Ersula Ore, a professor at Arizona State University, was body slammed by a police officer after being stopped for jaywalking near campus. Ore, however, is facing charges for assaulting a police officer, resisting arrest, refusing to provide identification when requested to do so by an officer, and obstructing a highway or public thoroughfare..

The incident occurred on May 20 when Ore, an English professor who teaches classes on Race Critical Theory among other topics, crossed the street, she says to avoid construction. She was stopped by Officer Stewart Ferrin, who works for campus police, and Ferrin demanded to see her ID. From there, the situation quickly escalated:

OFFICER: Let me see your ID or you will be arrested for failing to provide ID

ORE: Are you serious?

OFFICER: Yes, I’m serious. That is the law. If you don’t understand the law I’m explaining the law to you…

ORE: …I never once saw a single solitary individual get pulled over by a cop for walking across a street on a campus, in a campus location. Everybody has been doing this because it is all obstructed. That’s the reason why. But you stop me in the middle of the street to pull me over and ask me, ‘Do you know what this is? This is a street.’…

OFFICER: Are you aware this is a street?

ORE: Let me finish

OFFICER: OK, put your hands behind your back

ORE: Don’t touch me, get your hands off me…

OFFICER: …Put your hands behind your back right now. I’m going to slam you on this car. Put your hand behind your back

ORE: You really want to do that? Do you see what I’m wearing? Do you see?

OFFICER: I don’t care what you are wearing.

ORE: Don’t talk to me like that. This entire thing has been about your lack of respect for me.

Naturally, the police department says there is “no evidence of inappropriate actions by the ASUPD officers involved.”

More at Think Progress.

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In a story that sounds like good old-fashioned government-sponsored eugenics, a California doctor is accused of sterilizing female patients illegally. This is the sort of thing that inspired the Nazis and Josef Mengele and was the predecessor of the Holocaust.

The California State Auditor criticized federal and state oversight of sterilization surgeries for female prison inmates after finding numerous illegal surgeries and violations of the state’s informed consent law.

Of the 144 inmates who underwent tubal ligations from fiscal years 2005-06 to 2012-13, auditors found nearly one-third were performed without lawful consent, according to the report released Thursday.

In 27 cases, the inmate’s physician — the person who would perform the procedure in a hospital or an alternate physician — did not sign the required consent form asserting that the patient appeared mentally competent and understood the lasting effects of the procedure and that the required waiting period had been satisfied.

In some cases, physicians falsified the consent forms, indicating the proper waiting period had passed when it clearly had not.

The CIR investigation, published in July, found that 132 women received tubal ligations in violation of prison rules from 2006 to 2010 — and perhaps 100 more dating back to the late 1990s.

Heinrich previously told CIR that the money spent sterilizing inmates was minimal “compared to what you save in welfare paying for these unwanted children — as they procreated more.”

Dr. James Heinrich and his staff should be sued for their actions and have their medical licenses revoked and imprisoned. The story gets stranger, and creepier, when looking back at previous findings.

Dr. James Heinrich also has a history of medical controversies and expensive malpractice settlements both inside and outside prison walls. Female patients have accused him not just of trying to dictate their reproductive decisions, but also of unsanitary practices and botched surgeries that injured them and their infants.

Overall, the number of sterilization surgeries sharply increased after Heinrich joined the prison system and the federal court began oversight.

The responses to the increase site that Heinrich saw more patients than other doctors, but given his problems before being hired, why did the prison system decide to hire such a controversial figure?

Crystal Nguyen, a former Valley State inmate who worked in the prison infirmary, received a letter in August asking her to participate. “The Medical Board is currently examining Dr. Heinrich’s patient care,” it said.

Nguyen had many names to offer, she said, because Heinrich’s habits, like eating while conducting vaginal exams, were well known not just by inmates, but also by staff, who she said felt powerless to force him to change. Nguyen said she experienced those habits firsthand during her pregnancy at Valley State.

“He would be eating popcorn all the time. Popcorn, cheese and crackers. And he would be examining while he would be eating,” she said. “And to me, that’s not hygienic. … It was gross. It just creeped me out.”

To protect against infections, state and federal safety rules ban health care professionals from having food and drink in areas where patients are treated.

The CIR article gives several examples of how Heinrich simply didn’t care about his patients, whether they be in prison or not, and pushed unnecessary procedures on them. People place a huge amount of trust in doctors to know what is best. If something seems off, get a second opinion.

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