Loss of Privacy

Keeping you informed on recent losses to privacy and civil rights worldwide.

Browsing Posts tagged abuse

Daniel Boykin, 33, of Meigs Drive in Murfreesboro, has been charged with unlawful photography, aggravated burglary, wiretapping, unlawful telephone recording and two computer crimes.

WKRN News 2

Police say Boykin was infatuated with the victim, whom he allegedly recorded while she was on her phone in the restroom. That’s why he’s been charged with unlawful telephone recording and wiretapping.

Detectives also say Boykin went into the victim’s Nashville home on multiple occasions and took data from her computers and electronic devices.

There is no evidence any public restroom facilities were targeted by Boykin.

No need to worry, Boykin doesn’t look at everyone, only women he’s infatuated with.

According to the TSA, Boykin resigned before he could be terminated when the investigation began.

In a statement released to News 2 Tuesday, TSA officials stated, “This individual is no longer employed by the agency. TSA holds its employees to the highest ethical standards and has zero tolerance for misconduct in the workplace.”

They also noted that Boykin worked in an administrative role and had no interaction with the general public, and that the restroom involved in the investigation was only open to TSA officials.

Well, don’t we all feel better now?

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Source.

The original video from the TSA is below.

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TSA Logic

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tsa logic

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In the wake of Sept. 11, 2001, an aggressive brand of policing called “highway interdiction,” which involves authorities seizing money and property during traffic stops, has grown in popularity. Thousands of people not charged with crimes are left fighting legal battles to regain their money.

Cash seizures can be made under state or federal civil law. One of the primary ways police departments are able to seize money and share in the proceeds at the federal level is through a long-standing Justice Department civil asset forfeiture program known as Equitable Sharing. Asset forfeiture is an extraordinarily powerful law enforcement tool that allows the government to take cash and property without pressing criminal charges and then requires the owners to prove their possessions were legally acquired.

The practice has been controversial since its inception at the height of the drug war more than three decades ago, and its abuses have been the subject of journalistic exposés and congressional hearings. But unexplored until now is the role of the federal government and the private police trainers in encouraging officers to target cash on the nation’s highways since 9/11.

“Those laws were meant to take a guy out for selling $1 million in cocaine or who was trying to launder large amounts of money,” said Mark Overton, the police chief in Bal Harbour, Fla., who once oversaw a federal drug task force in South Florida. “It was never meant for a street cop to take a few thousand dollars from a driver by the side of the road.”

It’s the same, no matter where the police are conducting these stops.

In case after case, highway interdictors appeared to follow a similar script. Police set up what amounted to rolling checkpoints on busy highways and pulled over motorists for minor violations, such as following too closely or improper signaling. They quickly issued warnings or tickets. They studied drivers for signs of nervousness, including pulsing carotid arteries, clenched jaws and perspiration. They also looked for supposed “indicators” of criminal activity, which can include such things as trash on the floor of a vehicle, abundant energy drinks or air fresheners hanging from rearview mirrors.

More at The Washington Post.

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The notion that certain rights are guaranteed to citizens is being proven false every day. For instance, you have the First Amendment right to film police officers and other public officials, but it often takes an official policy change (usually prompted by lawsuits) before these public servants will begrudgingly respect that right.

More at techdirt.

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