Loss of Privacy

Keeping you informed on recent losses to privacy and civil rights worldwide.

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ocean parkway

According to the NY Post:

A speed camera in Brooklyn tallied a bank-busting 1,551 tickets in a single day this summer, according to the Department of Transportation. At $50 a pop, the July 7 ticket blitz generated $77,550 for city coffers.

The camera is located near Ocean Parkway at the end of a 400-foot exit ramp — “a good amount of distance for drivers to adjust their speeds,” a DOT spokesman said.

The area’s city councilman, Chaim Deutsch, praised it for making roadways safer.

“If anyone is speeding . . . they deserve a summons,” he told the blog Sheepshead Bites.

But Councilman Mark Treyger has blasted the camera’s location as a speed trap.

Speed-camera violations are issued to anyone going more than 10 mph over the posted speed limit, which in this case is 30 mph.

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Washington, D.C., police began wearing body cameras in a new pilot program that started October 1. They will test five camera modes in all seven police districts, in school security and special operations divisions.

Some will mount to a D.C. police officer’s collar or to the front of the officer’s shirt. Another model will be mounted to an eyeglass frame. But all will be ready to record the movements of 165 police officers as they interact with the public every day.

To help increase public trust between police officers and the city residents they are sworn to protect, District officers will begin wearing on-body cameras next week as they work. Police Chief Cathy L. Lanier hopes to expand the pilot program to each of her department’s thousands of patrol officers in the coming years.

Many complaints, she said, include multiple witness accounts that must be collected and reconciled by department personnel. “Now we’ll have a video,” Lanier said. “This gives us that independent, unbiased witness. . . . This will make our officers safer. It will make our department more transparent. It will reduce the amount of time supervisors have to spend investigating allegations.

Under departmental policy described by Lanier on Wednesday, officers will be required to turn on the camera as soon as they receive a call for service or other request for assistance and will leave the camera rolling until they finish the call. Video that is not retained for a criminal or administrative investigation will be deleted after 90 days, Lanier said.

Questions remain about malfunctions as police have the ability to turn the devices on and off when they choose. This renders the devices useless for oversight when they can “malfunction” at will.

In Albuquerque, New Mexico a police officer has a history of malfunctioning cameras. In one instance he killed a 19-year old woman.

Their use has also sparked privacy concerns.

The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department and the Los Angeles Police Department, along with police in New York, Chicago and Washington, have launched pilot programs to test cameras for wider deployment.

But equipping police with such devices also raises new and unsettled issues over privacy at a time when many Americans have been critical of the kind of powerful government surveillance measures that technology has made possible.

For many departments, questions remain about when officers should be allowed to turn off such cameras — especially in cases involving domestic violence or rape victims — and the extent to which video could be made public.

Video from dashboard cameras in police cars, a more widely used technology, has long been exploited for entertainment purposes. Internet users have posted dash-cam videos of arrests of naked women to YouTube, and TMZ sometimes obtains police videos of athletes and celebrities during minor or embarrassing traffic stops, turning officers into unwitting paparazzi.

Officers wearing body cameras could extend that public eye into living rooms or bedrooms, should a call require them to enter a private home.

A recent federal survey of 63 law enforcement agencies using body cameras said nearly a third of the agencies had no written policy on the devices. (It is not known how many agencies overall currently use body cameras.)

For that reason, experts and privacy advocates have encouraged departments to adopt policies that include allowing victims and reluctant witnesses to be filmed only with their consent.

The newly released federal report also suggests that departments should clearly outline policies for how long they will keep video recordings before deletion; 60- or 90-day holding periods are common, unless the video is used as criminal evidence or has been flagged in a complaint.

Should police wear body cameras? Absolutely. Should they have the ability to turn them off? Not a chance. If you want the program to be effective, the control of footage should never be in the hands of the police. Anyone involved in being recorded should also have the ability to request a copy of the footage for a low and reasonable fee.

Other police departments that have begun wearing body cameras this month include New York City.

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Daniel Boykin, 33, of Meigs Drive in Murfreesboro, has been charged with unlawful photography, aggravated burglary, wiretapping, unlawful telephone recording and two computer crimes.

WKRN News 2

Police say Boykin was infatuated with the victim, whom he allegedly recorded while she was on her phone in the restroom. That’s why he’s been charged with unlawful telephone recording and wiretapping.

Detectives also say Boykin went into the victim’s Nashville home on multiple occasions and took data from her computers and electronic devices.

There is no evidence any public restroom facilities were targeted by Boykin.

No need to worry, Boykin doesn’t look at everyone, only women he’s infatuated with.

According to the TSA, Boykin resigned before he could be terminated when the investigation began.

In a statement released to News 2 Tuesday, TSA officials stated, “This individual is no longer employed by the agency. TSA holds its employees to the highest ethical standards and has zero tolerance for misconduct in the workplace.”

They also noted that Boykin worked in an administrative role and had no interaction with the general public, and that the restroom involved in the investigation was only open to TSA officials.

Well, don’t we all feel better now?

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Source.

The original video from the TSA is below.

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TSA Logic

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