Glenn Greenwald was one of the first reporters to see — and write about — the Edward Snowden files, with their revelations about the United States’ extensive surveillance of private citizens. In this searing talk, Greenwald makes the case for why you need to care about privacy, even if you’re “not doing anything you need to hide.”

Transcript.

Source.

Did you know police can just take your stuff if they suspect it’s involved in a crime? They can!
It’s a shady process called “civil asset forfeiture,” and it would make for a weird episode of Law and Order.
See?

Source.

A man is suing the TSA after he says he opened his suitcase to find his mother’s ashes dumped out.

According to court documents, Mr. Thomas had followed all of the guidelines and properly packed his mother’s “heavy and sturdy” urn inside of his suitcase for check-in.

The urn was tightly screwed closed and he says it was packed with extra clothing for padding and protection.

But when he arrived in Puerto Rico, he found his mother ashes dumped inside of the suitcase, all over his clothing and with a TSA notice of inspection.

Seattle’s elected prosecutor says he’s dropping all tickets issued for the public use of marijuana through the first seven months of this year, because most of them were issued by a single police officer who disagrees with the legal pot law.

In a briefing to the City Council on Monday, City Attorney Pete Holmes said he is moving to dismiss approximately 100 tickets issued by the Seattle Police Department between Jan. 1 and July 31. His office also said it would be seeking a refund for those who have already paid their $27 ticket.

Through the first six months of the year, a single officer wrote about 80 percent of the tickets, addressing some of them to “Petey Holmes” or writing that he considered the pot law “silly.”

The officer, Randy Jokela, is now under official investigation by the department’s Office of Professional Accountability.

In one ticket, the officer wrote that he found two people smoking marijuana and made them flip a coin to decide which person would be cited.

“(Suspect) lost the coin flip so he got the ticket while the other person walked. (Suspect) was allowed to keep his pipe,” the ticket reads.

Others in the city are standing up for the officer.

A gallery of citations can be viewed online.

Komonews.

ocean parkway

According to the NY Post:

A speed camera in Brooklyn tallied a bank-busting 1,551 tickets in a single day this summer, according to the Department of Transportation. At $50 a pop, the July 7 ticket blitz generated $77,550 for city coffers.

The camera is located near Ocean Parkway at the end of a 400-foot exit ramp — “a good amount of distance for drivers to adjust their speeds,” a DOT spokesman said.

The area’s city councilman, Chaim Deutsch, praised it for making roadways safer.

“If anyone is speeding . . . they deserve a summons,” he told the blog Sheepshead Bites.

But Councilman Mark Treyger has blasted the camera’s location as a speed trap.

Speed-camera violations are issued to anyone going more than 10 mph over the posted speed limit, which in this case is 30 mph.

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