Loss of Privacy

Keeping you informed on recent losses to privacy and civil rights worldwide.

Sixteen-year-old Tyler Brandt wanted to work at the fast food chain to make some extra money, but he says his manager was always agitated and verbally abusive.

That fear led Brandt to let the words continue, until this week when he says the manager made the ultimate gesture of discrimination.

“He pulled me into the office and gave me a nametag that read ‘Gaytard’ on it and asked me to wear it. So, I put it on because I didn’t want to upset him and I felt that if I did do anything to upset him, it would cause me to lose my job because he’d be looking for ways to fire me,” Brandt said.

Brandt says he tried taking it off several times, but he says the manager forced him to wear it all day in front of the customers.

More.

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The Internet’s Own Boy: The Story of Aaron Swartz – Trailer from FilmBuff on Vimeo.

In Theaters and On Demand June 27, 2014

Aaron Swartz's online presence and influence was groundbreaking. From helping develop internet protocol RSS to his work as a co-founder of Reddit, the programming prodigy helped shape the digital landscape we all use today. Chronicling his pioneering efforts crusading for open access and free speech and the resulting legal nightmare and tragedy that ensued, “The Internet’s Own Boy” is a dynamic and moving portrait of a brilliant tech millionaire who renounced the values of Silicon Valley startup culture and used technology to tirelessly fight for social justice, no matter what the cost.

You can also read an interview with Aaron’s father.

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Deborah C. Peel, MD is the world’s leading advocate for patients’ rights to control the use of personal health information in electronic systems. She is also a practicing physician and Freudian psychoanalyst. She became an expert and privacy warrior to stop patients from being harmed. The lack of health privacy causes millions of US citizens to avoid early diagnosis and treatment for cancer, depression, and STDs every year.

Her passion is informing the public about privacy-enhancing technologies and the major fixes needed in law and policy, so they can join the battle to restore our civil and human rights to health privacy.

Before you think this isn’t a big deal, think again. Hospitals have begun creating profiles on current and potential patients by tracking their consumer data to identify when a person may become ill.

Information compiled by data brokers from public records and credit card transactions can reveal where a person shops, the food they buy, and whether they smoke. The largest hospital chain in the Carolinas is plugging data for 2 million people into algorithms designed to identify high-risk patients, while Pennsylvania’s biggest system uses household and demographic data.

Carolinas HealthCare System operates the largest group of medical centers in North Carolina and South Carolina, with more than 900 care centers, including hospitals, nursing homes, doctors’ offices and surgical centers. The health system is placing its data, which include purchases a patient has made using a credit card or store loyalty card, into predictive models that give a risk score to patients.

While all information would be bound by doctor-patient confidentiality, he said he’s aware some people may be uncomfortable with data going to doctors and hospitals. For these people, the system is considering an opt-out mechanism that will keep their data private,

How about just making the system opt-in? Anyone who wants to be spied upon and have others making their lifestyle decisions for them can participate. Those who value their privacy wouldn’t have to do a thing.

Video.

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Air Force base in El Segundo. Allegedly a guy with a backpack that had wires hanging from it was spotted so they shut down the neighborhood.

From Ars Technica:

A California man who has been arrested several times for recording police from the ground has now taken to the airways, using a drone to watch the watchers.

“It’s to try to promote transparency,” 42-year-old Daniel Saulmon told a Los Angeles news broadcast.

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The debate about net neutrality rages on, but the meaning of “open internet” vs. “closed internet” is seldom explained. Without an open or neutral internet, corporations like AT&T or Comcast can restrict bandwidth and charge people extra for faster connections or limit access to their competitors’ services altogether.

In the United States, a January 2014 ruling from the DC Circuit Court determined that the Federal Communication Commission (FCC) had no authority to enforce its previous rules about net neutrality. This opened the decision about how to govern the internet’s future up to law makers in the US Congress.

Net Neutrality – What a Closed Internet Means

This video describes what net neutrality complete with fake buffering in the video.

This video is really oversimplified and the voice of the speaker is not really great.

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