Loss of Privacy

Keeping you informed on recent losses to privacy and civil rights worldwide.

Body-worn video cameras are quickly becoming standard-issue for American police, especially at departments in the process of reform. And in New Orleans, the troubled police department is now requiring almost all officers to wear the cameras.

It’s hard to be positive about this when these cameras can “malfunction” and the footage can disappear just like the cameras in police cars.

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Liberal senator Bill Heffernan has taken a mocked-up “pipe bomb” into Parliament House to show new security arrangements are “a joke”.

Under the new system, some passholders and their belongings are not scanned when entering the building.

Previously, everybody coming into Parliament House had to be checked through security.

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Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

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Charles and David Koch have funneled millions of dollars to conservative candidates and causes over the last four decades while working tirelessly to open the floodgates for money in politics. The Koch brothers’ net worth tops $100 billion, currently tying for fourth on the Forbes 400 list of wealthiest Americans.

Their rise to becoming two of the nation’s most powerful political figures is explored in the new book, “Sons of Wichita: How the Koch Brothers Became America’s Most Powerful and Private Dynasty.” The story is based on hundreds of interviews with Koch family and friends, as well as thousands of pages of legal documents. We are joined by the book’s author, Daniel Schulman, a senior editor at Mother Jones magazine.

Transcript.

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Debtors prisons were outlawed in the United States nearly 200 years ago. And more than 30 years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court made it clear: Judges cannot send people to jail just because they are too poor to pay their court fines.

However, the Supreme Court didn’t tell courts how to determine what it means to “willfully” not pay. So it’s left to judges to make the sometimes difficult calculations.

An NPR news investigation has found there are wide discrepancies in how judges make those decisions. And every day, people go to jail because they failed to pay their court debts.

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