Would you lead a more active lifestyle if it meant lower life insurance premiums? Insurer John Hancock and Vitality, a global wellness firm, are hoping the answer is yes. But there is a condition: They get to track your activity.

The practice is already employed in Australia, Europe, Singapore and South Africa, where Vitality is based.

The companies announced the new plan Wednesday and posted a video on John Hancock’s website.

Here’s how the program works: Once you sign up, John Hancock sends you a Fitbit monitor as one way to track your fitness. You earn Vitality Points for your activities. As you accumulate points, your status rises — from bronze to silver to gold to platinum. The higher your status, the more you save each year on your life insurance premiums. The points also allow you benefits at stores like REI and Whole Foods as well as hotel chains like Hyatt.

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A mentally ill woman, Natasha McKenna, has died in police custody in Fairfax, Virginia after receiving four taser blasts to her back. McKenna was in police custody for two days before she was shackled and left unattended. She was finally ready to be moved when her deteriorating mental state caused her to begin resisting police and screaming, whereas the police responded by six Sheriff’s deputies putting on full biohazard suits and attempting to place her in a restrained wheel chair. When she wouldn’t bend her knees to sit in the chair McKenna was tasered, allowing her to be restrained in the chair. Within minutes of being shocked McKenna stopped breathing and CPR efforts were fruitless in attempting to revive her. She was revived three times in an ambulance before finally being pronounced deceased. Officials are awaiting the results of an autopsy to determine the actual cause of her death.

The manufacture of the TASER device warns against using the stungun on persons with ‘excited delirium’.

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After several community meetings, a San Jose city commission has decided to endorse use of a police drone. The pilot project still needs approval from the city council, but this marks an important step for police in getting the public to buy in.

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There are very few government checks on what America’s sweeping surveillance programs are capable of doing. John Oliver sits down with Edward Snowden to discuss the NSA, the balance between privacy and security, and dick-pics.

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People were stopped and not arrested more than 250,000 times by Chicago police officers from May 2014 to August 2014 — a rate much higher than New York City’s police department at the height of its use of stop-and-frisk in 2011, according to a new report by the ACLU of Illinois.

The report,released Monday, said Chicago overuses the highly criticized practice — which, much like New York’s, disproportionately targets black people and other minorities.
The review found that black people were stopped at a much higher rate. According to the report, African-Americans were subject to 72% of all stops yet account for just 32% of Chicago’s population.

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