The beauty of hackers, says cybersecurity expert Keren Elazari, is that they force us to evolve and improve. Yes, some hackers are bad guys, but many are working to fight government corruption and advocate for our rights. By exposing vulnerabilities, they push the Internet to become stronger and healthier, wielding their power to create a better world.

TED.

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Police traffic stops are in the news again, tragically, sparking a new round of discussion on whether and how to outfit police with cameras and other technology.

For several years now, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University’s CyLab Biometrics Center have been testing an iris recognition system that can be used to identify subjects at a range of up to 40 feet.

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“[A big event] doesn’t trigger privacy concerns,” she says. “What does trigger privacy concerns is the City of Boston installing a network of cameras — some in residential neighborhoods — that enable law enforcement to track individual people from the moment that we leave our homes in the morning until the moment we return at night, seeing basically everywhere we went and everything that we did.”

Boston Police won’t say how many cameras are already in the city’s network, or how many new ones are going up for the marathon. But some of them will stay online afterward.

More at NPR.

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John Iadarola host of The Young Turks and guest Michael Shure discuss another assault by a cop on a suspect, but who was at fault?

“It’s that time again; when we tell you about how our police force is constantly terrible at not killing or assaulting a suspect and following the law, but this time instead of a gun, taser, excessive force, or a K-9 unit, the police in question apparently just said, ‘screw it, car it is’, and maybe with an interesting plot twist. An officer in Marana, Arizona was following Mario Valencia in his patrol car while Valencia was on a crime spree on foot. Rather than being bothered with due process and all that paperwork the officer in question decided to ram Valencia with his patrol car sending Valencia spinning into the air like an exasperated toddler would to a slinky.

Marana Police Chief Terry Rozema officially stated that the officer did the right thing as Valencia was headed to a populated area. Valencia survived his run in with police and faces fifteen separate charges.”

Did this police officer make the right call?

More at CNN.

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Would you lead a more active lifestyle if it meant lower life insurance premiums? Insurer John Hancock and Vitality, a global wellness firm, are hoping the answer is yes. But there is a condition: They get to track your activity.

The practice is already employed in Australia, Europe, Singapore and South Africa, where Vitality is based.

The companies announced the new plan Wednesday and posted a video on John Hancock’s website.

Here’s how the program works: Once you sign up, John Hancock sends you a Fitbit monitor as one way to track your fitness. You earn Vitality Points for your activities. As you accumulate points, your status rises — from bronze to silver to gold to platinum. The higher your status, the more you save each year on your life insurance premiums. The points also allow you benefits at stores like REI and Whole Foods as well as hotel chains like Hyatt.

More at NPR.

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