Loss of Privacy

Keeping you informed on recent losses to privacy and civil rights worldwide.

A new report from the Government Accountability Office (GAO) shows the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) uses its Secure Flight Program to give many government employees special treatment.

In addition to members of Congress and federal judges, millions of employees of the Department of Defense, Homeland Security, and intelligence agencies are automatically being considered low risk. As a result, they’re able to use the less invasive and more convenient Pre-Check line at the airport.

As the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) has pointed out, this program creates something of a caste system in which government employees get special privileges, while civilians placed in the high or unknown risk categories can’t even find out the rationale for their categorization. “Ultimately,” the ACLU argues, “when we start rewarding or punishing people because of who they are, as opposed to what they’ve done, we drift farther from the principles at the heart of our Constitution.”

There’s no need to complain when you get the perks no one else does. Read the report below.

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Daniel Boykin, 33, of Meigs Drive in Murfreesboro, has been charged with unlawful photography, aggravated burglary, wiretapping, unlawful telephone recording and two computer crimes.

WKRN News 2

Police say Boykin was infatuated with the victim, whom he allegedly recorded while she was on her phone in the restroom. That’s why he’s been charged with unlawful telephone recording and wiretapping.

Detectives also say Boykin went into the victim’s Nashville home on multiple occasions and took data from her computers and electronic devices.

There is no evidence any public restroom facilities were targeted by Boykin.

No need to worry, Boykin doesn’t look at everyone, only women he’s infatuated with.

According to the TSA, Boykin resigned before he could be terminated when the investigation began.

In a statement released to News 2 Tuesday, TSA officials stated, “This individual is no longer employed by the agency. TSA holds its employees to the highest ethical standards and has zero tolerance for misconduct in the workplace.”

They also noted that Boykin worked in an administrative role and had no interaction with the general public, and that the restroom involved in the investigation was only open to TSA officials.

Well, don’t we all feel better now?

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The incredible story of how a 16-year-old high school sophomore from the Bronx ended up spending nearly three years locked up at the Rikers jail in New York City after he says he was falsely accused of stealing a backpack. Kalief Browder never pleaded guilty and was never convicted. Browder maintained his innocence and requested a trial, but was only offered plea deals while the trial was repeatedly delayed.

Near the end of his time in jail, the judge offered to sentence him to time served if he entered a guilty plea, and warned him he could face 15 years in prison if he was convicted. But Browder still refused to accept the deal, and was only released when the case was dismissed. During this time, Browder spent nearly 800 days in solitary confinement, a juvenile imprisonment practice that the New York Department of Corrections has now banned.

We are joined by reporter and author Jennifer Gonnerman, who recounts Browder’s story in the current issue of The New Yorker. We also speak with Browder’s current attorney, Paul Prestia, who has filed a lawsuit against the City of New York, the New York City Police Department, the Bronx District Attorney, and the Department of Corrections, on Browder’s behalf.

More at Democracy Now.

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While there is no uniform standard in America for tabulating the incidence of crime against ATM users, the U.S. Department of Justice has estimated that such attacks occur at a proportion as low as 1 in 3.5 million transactions.

At this rate, the average American is in greater danger of being hit by a bus while crossing the street to get to an ATM than of being accosted while using it.

ATM transaction data, on the other hand, has proven far more difficult to protect — as we’ve seen in recent ATM skimming events that have netted millions of dollars within minutes for determined thieves.

To help consumers to help themselves, Diebold has created an infographic that ATM deployers can use to teach customers about ATM fraud. The information can be distributed as a flyer, mailer or email, posted online or at a machine — even displayed on the ATM screen itself.

ATM Skimming - Modern-Day Bank Robbery [infographic]
ATM Skimming – Modern-Day Bank Robbery [infographic]
Compliments of ATMmarketplace.com

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From EPIC:

The Department of Homeland Security released the 2014 Privacy Office Annual Report to Congress. The report describes a joint review conducted with the European Commission regarding the transfer of EU Passenger Name Records to the US. The European Commission found the redress mechanisms were lacking for passengers denied boarding. The Commission also found that DHS would often review passenger records without a legal reason. The Annual Report describes the sixth Compliance Review of the department’s social media monitoring program. The review found that the DHS began collecting GPS and geo-location of Internet users without assessing or mitigating the privacy risks. In 2012, EPIC obtained FOIA documents revealing that the Department of Homeland Security monitored social media for political dissent. For more information, see EPIC: EU-US Airline Passenger Data Disclosure and EPIC: EPIC v. DHS – media monitoring.

You can read the report below.

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