Loss of Privacy

Keeping you informed on recent losses to privacy and civil rights worldwide.

When Amy Barnes rode her bike to the store to buy some butter, she never thought she’d end up in jail.

In the police dash cam video, Barnes is heard hurling an expletive as she peddles by while they question a suspect.

“(Expletive deleted) the police.”

Barnes, who was unavailable, admitted to FOX 5 News in October of 2012 of her actions.

“And I said (expletive deleted) the police and raised the middle finger and passed by.”

On camera an officer reacted to the profanity: “That ain’t happening.”

Police followed Barnes, arrested her and charged her with disorderly conduct then took her to jail.

Cynthia Counts her attorney says police were heavy handed on Barnes.

“She could have been given a citation, but was arrested, put in solitary confinement, for part of it, she was in jail more than 24 hours.”

Atlanta News, Weather, Traffic, and Sports | FOX 5

The judge dismissed the charge despite claims by police Barnes’ profanity offended others as heard on the police video:

“You see the little kids standing on the corner you think they care to hear your language.”

Barnes and Counts sued the county claiming violation of free speech. Cobb County settled for one hundred thousand dollars.

It doesn’t matter who is offended by the speech. Just because a person doesn’t like what you say, doesn’t mean you can’t say it.

flattr this!

Al Jazeera America has created a graphic novel explaining big data. In the graphic novel, reads learn about what we gain and what we give up.

terms of service

Download (PDF, 41.3MB)

flattr this!

Source.

flattr this!

One law for the people. Another for those in charge.

flattr this!

video platformvideo managementvideo solutionsvideo player

“We cannot criminalize such a large population of society that engage in casual marijuana use,” the chief said in the radio interview. The topics were wide-ranging — but the chief was largely asked about marijuana use. McClelland made it clear he believes enforcing marijuana laws is wasting time and other valuable resources.

“Taxpayers can’t afford to build jails and prisons to lock up everyone that commits a crime,” said McClelland. “We must put more money into crime prevention, treatment, education, job training.”

More at 2 Houston.

flattr this!