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Threatpost Editor in Chief Mike Mimoso talks to crypto pioneer and security expert Bruce Schneier of Resilient Systems about the early days of the RSA Conference, the integration of privacy and security, and the current FBI-Apple debate over encryption and surveillance.

On the video, one of the men distracts the clerk while the other places the skimmer over the payment keypad located near the register. It took less than three seconds to put it in place.

More on CBS News.

Despite warnings each year about what a bad password is and how to make a better one, people are still using terrible passwords, putting their information at risk.

The most popular code behind which people store their valuables is “123456,” with “password” sitting comfortably in second place. Places three and four are similarly guessable, with “12345678” and “qwerty” being the… look, guys, just no, please stop doing this.

The top two remain unchanged. The top choice, “123456” has remained unchanged since 2013.

  • 123456
    password
    12345678
    qwerty
    12345
    123456789
    football
    1234
    1234567
    baseball
    welcome
    1234567890
    abc123
    111111
    1qaz2wsx
    dragon
    master
    monkey
    letmein
    login
    princess
    qwertyuiop
    solo
    passw0rd
    starwars
  • While officers raced to a recent 911 call about a man threatening his ex-girlfriend, a police operator in headquarters consulted software that scored the suspect’s potential for violence the way a bank might run a credit report.

    The program scoured billions of data points, including arrest reports, property records, commercial databases, deep Web searches and the man’s social- media postings. It calculated his threat level as the highest of three color-coded scores: a bright red warning.

    The man had a firearm conviction and gang associations, so out of caution police called a negotiator. The suspect surrendered, and police said the intelligence helped them make the right call — it turned out he had a gun.

    Story and video.

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