Loss of Privacy

Keeping you informed on recent losses to privacy and civil rights worldwide.

Browsing Posts in USA Privacy

Abby Martin takes a look at a terrifying new ad by General Dynamics on the future of MAVs, mini drones capable of eavesdropping and discrete assassinations.

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While the government insists that they have no plans to carry out drone strikes within the borders of the United States, their actions speak otherwise.

…despite that pledge, there is every intention to expand the use of so-called mini-drones inside the U.S. Used mostly by local police and first responders, the Federal Aviation Administration has already granted 327 licenses, and it projects as many as 10,000 licensed systems by 2017.

“They would use them for specific missions such as finding  a lost person or a missing child that’s lost in the woods, or for monitoring traffic, or potentially for crowd control. In the meantime, the firefighting community would be interested in using these to fly them over a fire and identify hotspots.”

Notice how the “potential” for crowd control is tossed in the middle of finding lost children and helping in forest fires. They already plan on using them against the people, they just hope that no one will notice because everyone wants to find little lost Sally, don’t they?


There are many privacy issues with using mini-drones on unsuspecting Americans and the courts haven’t been in favor of ordinary citizens.

For example, the Supreme Court ruled that the police can look into your backyard even if you have a high fence, with no warrant. You have no 4th amendment protection there,” he said.

Although many people are signaling the privacy implications, the Department of Homeland Security has only just begun setting up a committee to study what impact there will be to the civil liberties and rights of American citizens.

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“If E-Verify becomes mandatory, the result will be that you will essentially have to get cleared with a government right-to-work list before you can start a job. And that’s a huge change,” argues Chris Calabrese, legislative counsel for privacy issues at the American Civil Liberties Union.

E-Verify, a government-operated database of everyone legally permitted to work in the United States, is currently used by hundreds of thousands of employers to check the status of their workers. Yet a national identification system has no precedent in the United States. Can E-Verify certify work status for immigrants and native-born workers alike without trampling on our civil liberties?

Chris Calabrese sat down with Todd Krainin of ReasonTV to discuss the problems with national identification cards, new proposals for immigration reform, and how social networking has changed our expectations of personal privacy.

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In this video obtained by the Guardian, Raytheon’s ‘principal investigator’ Brian Urch explains how the Rapid Information Overlay Technology (Riot) software uses photographs on social networks. These images sometimes contain latitude and longitude details – automatically embedded by smartphones within so-called ‘exif header data’. Riot pulls out this information, analysing not only the photographs posted by individuals, but also the location where these images were taken




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More at The Raw Story.

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