Loss of Privacy

Keeping you informed on recent losses to privacy and civil rights worldwide.

Browsing Posts in USA Privacy

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It started with a hidden camera we discovered was at the Mobile On The Run on Clarkson, just south of the Chesterfield Mall. Video from a hidden camera showed people going to the bathroom and the videos were posted on a pornographic web site.

Our investigation started on the East Coast, where a man said he clicked on a banner that took him to the offensive porn web site. He noticed many victims wearing company shirts. That’s how we found victim Rob Cheney who told us, “When I saw myself pooping, I was just like you’ve gotta be kidding me.”

We asked Cheney for a list of places where he used the bathroom. He explained, “I had to think because you don’t document everywhere you go to the bathroom, so it took me awhile to pinpoint where it was.”

Fox 2 checked his list of rest rooms, comparing the online video to each bathroom. Then we found a perfect match, from the floor tiles to the drain by the toilet. Cheney just moved to the area and laughed, “Three weeks and I’m already on a poop cam pretty much. So three weeks and everybody’s seen me poop? That’s terrible. Hahaha.”

The police officer is set to face a grand jury.

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backscatter_large

After years of backlash, the TSA removed the controversial screening machines that had the capability of revealing too much in their images. They weren’t scrapped entirely. They are now being transferred to state and local prisons across the country.

So far, 154 of the machines have been transferred to prisons in states including Iowa, Virginia and Louisiana. It’s a good fit because privacy concerns raised by airport passengers do not apply in many cases to prisoners, according to TSA.

Arkansas received five of the scanners in early May for use by local sheriffs as well, according to TSA. The remaining 96 scanners are still being stored in the warehouses of scanner manufacturer Rapiscan.

“TSA and the vendor are working with other government agencies interested in receiving the units for their security mission needs and for use in a different environment,” TSA spokesman Ross Feinstein said.

TSA owned about 250 of the screening machines at its peak — valued at about $40 million — before removing them from airports in the first half of 2013 in response to pressure over the virtually nude images it created of passengers.

The machines were banned in Europe. The TSA trivialized health and safety concerns until Congress got involved, but, somehow, after sitting in a warehouse for a while, they are magically okay to use on prisoners.

The very real health concerns were never addressed and will become a problem if these machines are widely used on a regular basis.

The systemic repercussions of widespread application of X-Ray backscatter systems in the various private penal colonies of the united states, while financially sound at its salesmans word, certainly isnt a long term bet to hedge. Incidences of debilitating cancers will need medical treatment for both guards and prisoners alike as has been shown in the incidences of cancer for certain groups of TSA screeners. Liability for introducing a prisoner or employee to a cancer suspect agent will likely follow the course of most other folly of american scientific perversion in the hands of government.

It will likely be assigned to the government, who in turn will insist it was the technology, and in turn the manufacturer will absolve itself through a complex series of medical puppet shows, out of court settlements, and evasive restructuring practices so as to ensure no real harm comes to the corporation. Once your sentence is complete, and you emerge from prison, the biblical retribution set upon you is now the denial of employment, housing, food stamps, medicare, and finally a malignant cancer risk substantially greater than the rest of society as your corrections system applied background scanners quietly and incessantly for the duration of your incarceration.

America has the highest incarceration rate in the world. The consequences could be staggering.

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The NSA has nothing on the ed tech startup known as Knewton.

The data analytics firm has peered into the brains of more than 4 million students across the country. By monitoring every mouse click, every keystroke, every split-second hesitation as children work through digital textbooks, Knewton is able to find out not just what individual kids know, but how they think. It can tell who has trouble focusing on science before lunch — and who will struggle with fractions next Thursday.

Even as Congress moves to rein in the National Security Agency, private-sector data mining has galloped forward — perhaps nowhere faster than in education. Both Republicans and Democrats have embraced the practice. And the Obama administration has encouraged it, even relaxing federal privacy law to allow school districts to share student data more widely.

At least in Nevada, it will cost a parent $10,000 to learn what data the schools are collecting on his child.

Read more.

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