Loss of Privacy

Keeping you informed on recent losses to privacy and civil rights worldwide.

Browsing Posts in USA Privacy

There’s no doubt in my mind that we, as an Internet community, need to take back our state legislatures. We need our current legislators to recognize their strengths and weaknesses, to focus their energies on the problems that they properly understand and are best suited to solving (which almost never involve Internet regulation), and to find another job if they can’t wield their power wisely. Before you just vote for your incumbent state legislators next election, ask yourself if they have been doing right by the Internet.

Why State Legislatures Shouldn’t Regulate Internet Privacy from Whittier Law School on Vimeo.

Whittier Law School, 2013-14 Colloquia and Distinguished Speaker Series
Distinguished Speaker in Privacy Law:
Prof. Eric Goldman, Santa Clara Law School
"Why State Legislatures Shouldn't Regulate Internet Privacy"

Slides and audio.

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In an effort to increase campus security, TSU will require students, faculty and staff to wear Identification Cards while on campus. This is part of a broader effort to increase campus safety for the University community.

After a spate of break-ins and vandalism, officials at the university instituted the new ID requirement as a way to ensure safety on campus, a TSU release said.

So, instead of doing some actual police work to find those responsible or admitting that break-ins and vandalism happen all the time all over the world and not all are solvable, they institute draconian measures to track everyone.

“Our primary concern is always to provide a safe and healthy environment for all of our students, employees and visitors,” said Dr. Curtis Johnson, associate vice president for administration, who is in charge of Emergency Management. “Safety on our campus is priority number one, and with the new policy we want to ensure that our students, faculty, and staff are safe at all times.”

Notice that this is being implemented in the name of safety. Everyone is buying into “it must be a good thing” and “they’re looking out for us.”

Those at the university should also be looking into who is storing the information and for how long. Then, they might want to look at who the university is giving access to the data and how it’s going to be monetized.

If you don’t want to be tracked, you could simply make a copy of your ID, put it on display and keep the real ID in an RFID blocking wallet. That’s what the criminals are going to be doing as well as cloning IDs for whatever nefarious things they think of.

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The appeal is obvious, especially for cash-strapped, high-crime cities such as Oakland, Calif. City leaders there say they simply don’t have the tax base to pay for the number of police officers they need, so they’ve looked toward “domain awareness” as a kind of force multiplier.

For the past couple of years, the city of Oakland has worked with the Port of Oakland to build its own version of the system. It’s called the Domain Awareness Center, or DAC. The federal government is paying for it with Homeland Security grants. But as the project grew, so did opposition.

After last summer’s revelations of domestic spying by the National Security Agency, protesters started showing up en masse at Oakland City Council meetings. One signed in for the public comment period as “Edward Snowden”; another stood up to videorecord the council while supporters cheered and jeered. In November, protesters became so raucous, they forced the council to clear the hall.

Source.

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How and why the US government surveils on its citizens.

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You have a right to privacy. How about when you are driving around Manhattan? Maybe not.

On January 7, 2014, the New York Civil Liberties Union sent the New York State Department of Transportation, the New York City Department of Transportation and the NYPD formal legal requests for information on how they use E-ZPass readers to track and record New Yorkers’ movements. The request was filed after several recent press reports documented the use of E-ZPass readers to collect information on law-abiding New Yorkers far from toll plazas.

“New Yorkers have a right to know if their use of toll-paying technology is secretly being used to track their innocent comings and goings,” said NYCLU Executive Director Donna Lieberman. “No one should have to trade their privacy to pay a $10 toll.

“The NYCLU’s video shows the E-ZPass detector – the device that looks like a cow – going off almost constantly during a drive through Midtown and Lower Manhattan — in areas free of toll collection booths. In the area around 34th Street and Seventh Avenue, the cow lit up continuously for several blocks. It even detected a signal directly in front of the NYCLU’s office in the Wall Street area.

“An E-ZPass is a great convenience, but the technology in it can easily be misused. Given the potential for abuse when the government systematically starts collecting information about the day-to-day activities of law-abiding people, it is essential that there be clear and explicit limitations on how E-ZPass readers are used,” NYCLU Legislative Counsel Nate Vogel said. “The public should know if, how and why we are being tracked.”

The NYCLU’s Freedom of Information requests specifically seek information about the criteria and purpose for installing E-ZPass readers; the location of E-ZPass readers, including, any information distinguishing those used to collect tolls and those used for other purposes; privacy policies and marketing materials describing the types of data that can be collected by E-ZPass readers, when it will be collected and how it will be used; and how the New York City Department of Transportation shares data with other entities, including but not limited to the NYPD, the FBI and the Drug Enforcement Administration.

Find out more at nyclu, or follow us on Facebook and Twitter to find out more as the story develops.

You can also read more about E-ZPass tags from Kashmir Hill.

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