Loss of Privacy

Keeping you informed on recent losses to privacy and civil rights worldwide.

Browsing Posts in Police Abuse

This happened January 31st 2014 I’m the downtown st Paul sky way… And they confiscated the phones for 6 months.

It is abundantly clear that things did not escalate until the second police officer came on the scene. That officer threatened Chris Lollie from the moment he arrived, telling him he was getting arrested no matter what. The second officer never bothered to assess the situation. He came into the situation looking to arrest someone. Lollie asked several times what he did wrong and why he needed to show identification. The best answer the police could give is “because I said so.”

These police officers are the reason people hate the police so much. The second officer comes in, acts like a bully and demands his authority be respected. The first officer is an enabler who does nothing to stop the second officers abusive behavior despite no crime having been committed.

From KARE 11:

Chris Lollie was at the First National Bank Building last January when he was approached by St Paul Police officers, according to an incident report. He started recording video on his cell phone as they asked for his name.

But in the video Lollie can be heard telling the officers he was in a public space picking up his kids from New Horizon Academy and wasn’t breaking any laws. In just a few seconds things escalate.

Lollie did not commit any crime. He was walking out of the area, which is his right as he was not being detained. He stopped walking once the officer told him he was under arrest. Until that point, Lollie had no legal requirement to stop walking.

Minnesota also does not have a “Stop and Identify” statute, which would require you to stop and identify yourself if criminal activity has occurred in the area.

Lollie was exercising his first and fourth amendment rights. He broke no law. He was under no obligation to follow their commands.

Lollie was charged with trespassing, disorderly conduct and obstruction. But all charges were dismissed last month. Lollie did not respond to questions about why he released the video nearly eight months after it was recorded.

If they watch the original video, Lollie explains in the description of the video on YouTube, his cell phone was confiscated for six months. The charge of trespassing seems suspicious because he was in a public place in the middle of the day.

This is how the exchange should have gone. The first cop finds the person who made the complaint. If Lollie is in a public area, inform the person that they are allowed to legally be there and she could go on with her day. If he wasn’t allowed in that particular area, then the cop should have informed Lollie and asked him to move. The discussion would have been short and easy.

Cop 1: It is your right to not want to give me your name. You are not under arrest and you are free to leave if you wish, just please don’t occupy [whatever space it was he was allegedly in] because of [insert reason].

Lollie: That’s fine officer. I’m just on my way to pick up my kids.

And they both go their separate ways.

At no point in time was Lollie wrong and he was calm and reasonable until Cop 2 showed up.

Instead Cop 1 yammers on and on until Cop 2 comes along with a chip on his shoulder acting like Eric Cartman.

You can read more at The Atlantic.

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John Oliver makes many points that individuals have been making for the past 5-10 years.

In the wake of the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, MO, John Oliver explores the racial inequality in treatment by police as well as the increasing militarization of America’s local police forces.

Source.

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From the ACLU:

Download (PDF, 4.61MB)

Discussion at reddit.

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More.

The sheriff actually tried to fire this guy in 2007 for filing false reports. Are they going to wait until he kills someone before they get rid of him?

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Carlos Harris was out with his friend, Ryan Dominique, when police were called to the scene on reports of Dominique driving recklessly in the parking lot of Club Insomnia on Florida Blvd.

Dominique was subsequently arrested at which point officer Magee asked Harris to move his friend’s car.

When asked to move the car, Harris told Magee he was drunk and did not wish to do so. According to witness Aisha Loliss, Magee then “commanded him to move the car.”

More than 50 cameras, including multiple police dashcams, captured the various angles of what happened next. The videos show Harris driving the car into a police unit, pull forward and hit another car, then crash into the police car again.

The car was traveling forward away from him when Magee shot Harris from behind. One of the three shots Magee fired also hit a woman nearby in the wrist.

Harris was killed as a result of the shots. A toxicology report also showed that his blood alcohol level was .089 making his claim of being intoxicated true.

The police department has now settled with Harris’ family for $495,000. Magee was cleared of wrongdoing, has never been disciplined for his actions and is still patrolling the streets of Baton Rouge.

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