Transcript. Story.

Edward Snowden participated in his first public debate on encryption on Tuesday, April 26, 2016. CNN’s Fareed Zakaria debated Snowden on the issue.

Zakaria, in New York, defended the government’s right to access any and all encrypted messages and devices as long as there’s court approval. Snowden, speaking over a live video-link from Moscow, argued the security of the Internet is more important than the convenience of law enforcement. The debate was organized by NYU’s Wagner School of Public Service and the Century Foundation.

The Intercept has more information and the full video is available from The Century Foundation.

The trailer for the forthcoming Oliver Stone movie Snowden has been viewed over two million times less than 24 hours after it was posted on Youtube, suggesting huge interest in the story of one of America’s most polarizing heroes/traitors, ahead of the film’s release in September this year.

After the clip was posted, the real Edward Snowden, the CIA operative who smuggled vast amounts of data exposing the workings of the NSA, and is now living in Russia, tweeted: “For two minutes and thirty nine seconds, everybody at NSA just stopped working.”

More at The Daily Beast.

The US Senate has published a draft law to force tech companies to show encrypted messages to security services.

The Compliance with Court Orders Act would force companies to hand over what is called “intelligible” or non-encrypted data, if they receive a court order.

It follows decisions by Apple and Whatsapp take a stand on encryption.

Apple has been locked in a battle with the FBI over its refusal to unlock its iPhone.

And Facebook recently announced all messages on its messaging app, Whatsapp are now encrypted.

Is the right to keep our online information a secret about to be banned?

And where should the line be between privacy and transparency?

Source.

The film tells the story of how almost 400 journalists managed the investigation in the Panama Papers. It’s the biggest leak and biggest project of cooperative investigative journalism.

A giant leak of more than 11.5 million financial and legal records exposes a system that enables crime, corruption and wrongdoing, hidden by secretive offshore companies.

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