Loss of Privacy

Keeping you informed on recent losses to privacy and civil rights worldwide.

password-security

The most popular passwords in 2014 remain the simple and easily guessed.

The data is compiled from leaked passwords in 2014, by password company SplashData. The passwords used were mostly from North American and Western European leaks — a large batch of leaked passwords from Russian accounts were excluded from the list, for example.

SplashData recommends using passwords of eight characters or more, with mixed types of characters such as numbers or special letters. It also suggests not using the same username and password on multiple websites — a process that can be helped out with automatic password management programs like Dashlane, LastPass, or SplashID itself.

New this year were 696969, football, baseball, batman and superman.

The full list of the worst passwords:

1 123456 (Unchanged from 2013)

2 password (Unchanged)

3 12345 (Up 17)

4 12345678 (Down 1)

5 qwerty (Down 1)

6 1234567890 (Unchanged)

7 1234 (Up 9)

8 baseball (New)

9 dragon (New)

10 football (New)

11 1234567 (Down 4)

12 monkey (Up 5)

13 letmein (Up 1)

14 abc123 (Down 9)

15 111111 (Down 8)

16 mustang (New)

17 access (New)

18 shadow (Unchanged)

19 master (New)

20 michael (New)

21 superman (New)

22 696969 (New)

23 123123 (Down 12)

24 batman (New)

25 trustno1 (Down 1)

Photo.

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At least 50 U.S. law enforcement agencies have secretly equipped their officers with radar devices that allow them to effectively peer through the walls of houses to see whether anyone is inside, a practice raising new concerns about the extent of government surveillance.

The radars work like finely tuned motion detectors, using radio waves to zero in on movements as slight as human breathing from a distance of more than 50 feet. They can detect whether anyone is inside of a house, where they are and whether they are moving.

HOW IT WORKS

“The idea that the government can send signals through the wall of your house to figure out what’s inside is problematic,” said Christopher Soghoian, the American Civil Liberties Union’s principal technologist. “Technologies that allow the police to look inside of a home are among the intrusive tools that police have.”

Agents’ use of the radars was largely unknown until December, when a federal appeals court in Denver said officers had used one before they entered a house to arrest a man wanted for violating his parole. The judges expressed alarm that agents had used the new technology without a search warrant, warning that “the government’s warrantless use of such a powerful tool to search inside homes poses grave Fourth Amendment questions.”

By then, however, the technology was hardly new. Federal contract records show the Marshals Service began buying the radars in 2012, and has so far spent at least $180,000 on them.

More at USA Today.

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Bruce Schneier, Harvard Berkman Center Fellow, talks with Edward Snowden about government surveillance and the effectiveness of privacy tools like encryption to an audience at Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. This conversation kicks off the annual symposium on the future of computation in science and engineering hosted by the IACS- Harvard’s Institute for Applied Computational Science.

The Boston Globe also covered the event.

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From TSA Watch:

We are seeking funds to start a National Watchdog Group that will force the Transportation Security Agency (TSA) to clean up their act.

We are a Citizen Watchdog Group, working to protect traveler rights and dignity from abuses by the TSA. We strive to ensure no violations go unreported and grievances are addressed and redressed.

Mission Statement: TSA Watch is a new membership organization being built to will serve the traveling public, American Citizens and Visitors, by working to ensure personal liberty is not sacrificed in the pursuit of national security. For the first time the public will work together in increasing numbers to watch the TSA and make sure all violations are reported. Members and other travelers will enjoy a centralized place to share their own complaints about the TSA, get help with filing official complaints with the TSA itself, and work together to seek redress of grievances and a halt to TSA’s worst patterns of violating human rights to life, liberty, property and the pursuit of happiness.

Long Description:

TSA Watch will become the “go to” organization for Citizens and guests to address their concerns with the US Transportation Security Administration, the TSA.

For those who don’t know, the TSA is the organization that conducts most screening and searches of air travelers, and increasingly travelers of every modality.

While we prepare the infrastructure for the launch of our fully functional watchdog group, with all of it’s features, this Facebook page will serve as a forum for those who wish to share their TSA experiences publicly. We will also share news, videos and other information pertaining to TSA misbehavior.

Please feel free to share your tales of TSA mistreatment as comments, which will be curated and then made public.

Discussion:
Currently, there are numerous violations being reported in a haphazard manner across the Internet, but there is no one place to collect this information and do something about it. Complaints vary, but the top six areas of complaint include:

1. Lack of accomodation in security screening for travelers with documented medical conditions that routinely trigger in depth scans,
2. Theft of personal property,
3. Damage to personal property,
4. Sexual violations by TSA Agents groping the breasts, genitals, and other private areas of a person’s body,
5. Abusive language and attitude directed by the agents to people, and
6. Arbitrary delay of travelers making them miss their connections, which leads to lost work, happiness, and opportunity.

We will address these violations by:
1) creating TSA Watch, a new national membership organization
2) bringing to light the frequent violations of traveler’s person, property, and dignity currently made by TSA personnel,
3) by documenting patterns of these abuses,
4) by bringing further light through investigation of those TSA divisions and personal making the most egregious violations, and
5) bringing public scrutiny to these abuses through every medium we can.

The group has a go fund me page to raise support.

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WAFF-TV: News, Weather and Sports for Huntsville, AL

Superintendent Hugh Taylor feels it forces the school teachers to act as parents and also questions. What happens if a child becomes so offended they have to leave the theater?

High school History club students were banned from seeing the movie “Selma” because there is obscene language and racial profanity in the movie. Since this is a school outing, parents were presumably sent permission slips so the school’s stance that they don’t want to be the parents is moot.

If your child cannot handle being offended, then they probably shouldn’t go. Since this is a club, the movie is probably a voluntary thing and no one is required to attend. Also, the students are likely the ones who thought it would be a great idea to attend a viewing of the movie. If the club is like every other high school club, they would have talked about the issue already and prepared the students for what they are likely to see and hear, which is probably similar to their every day lives anyway.

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